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Carefully consider height and spread before including a plant in the landscape (Figure 19-2). If the adult size is too large, a plant can overwhelm the design. If the plants stay small at maturity, they may seem inappropriate as a bottom border. Balance equals the creation of equal visual weight on each side of a focal point, creating a pleasant integration of the planet. ments. There are two types of equilibrium: symmetrical and asymmetrical. The symmetrical balance describes a formal balance with everything on one axis, duplicated or reflected on the other side. The symmetry is commonly observed in formal gardens (Figure 19 – 3).

These resources are available on the NC State Extension website. Check the website of your county extension co-op center for a list of upcoming classes related to landscaping design. 2. Where can I get a list of plants that grow well in this area? NC State Extension has a searchable plant database that tracks plants suitable for various areas of North Carolina. You can search by size, light requirements, flower color, leaf color, what a plant attracts, areas, and much more.

Then add gravel on the sides and on the top before covering the pipe. The perforated drain hose is also available with the sock in place. A dry well is simply a large hole filled with gravel or other aggregate that picks up the excess water and holds it up as it penetrates the soil. You can increase the capacity of a dry well by burying barrels of special dry wells. These plastic containers collect the water and hold it as it flows through the holes on the sides and bottom. Containers should be surrounded by gravel or other porous material to allow drainage. You can stack these dry plastic wells or place them side by side. In general, a dry well should be large enough to collect the first 10 or 15 minutes of heavy rain. Websites like ndspro.com provide tips and calculators to help you determine the size of your dry well.

Use compost and mulch to build healthy soil and improve plant resistance to pests and diseases. Limit the widespread use of gravel, rocks and other inert mulches. Although they work well for keeping weeds, these mulches do not return organic matter to the environment. Look for a certified mulch free of wood contaminants treated at the ACC. More information can be found on the website of the professional mulch association - the Mulch and Soil Council (http://www.mulchandsoilcouncil.org). â € ¢ Design paved areas so that paving modules (such as bricks or pavers) do not require excessive cutting and loss of material. Use bridges, patios, ponds, retaining walls, garden walls and rock gardens to add interest and create spaces, but find a good balance between these hardscape elements and the planted areas.

Solvents used to dilute paints and stains should be based on plant rather than mineral. Paint and stain pigments should be made from inorganic soil and mineral pigments and preservatives should be water-based and include salts of zinc, copper or fluoride. The website of the independent nonprofit organization Green Seal has more information on environmentally friendly paints and solvents at Design wooden structures to evacuate rainwater. Any wood that becomes wet and does not dry is vulnerable to decay and insect attack. Protect the endgrains with stoppers and do not put the ends of the poles in concrete soles that retain the water.

Limit the amount of impermeable surfaces that collect heat and increase stormwater runoff. Consider using a permeable paving system - such as gravel or pavers that have open centers to plant grass - for patios, alleys and alleys to promote infiltration, improve drainage and limit runoff (Figure 19-46). Choose energy-efficient building materials. Remember that light pollution is a problem in urban and suburban areas and even affects migratory birds, moths and butterflies.

Make sure the final plant selections are appropriate for the site and design. For example, choose a large evergreen tree as an indigenous arborvitae cultivar (Thuja occidentalis) and locate several to build a screen or windbreaker. Select tall deciduous trees planted away from the home's foundation on the south and west exposures to mitigate the hot summer temperatures. For shaded areas, consider shade tolerant perennials such as Indian pink (Spigelia marilandica), tiarella cordifolia, white aster (Eurybia divaricatus) and green and gold (Chrysogonum). virginianum) around shade-tolerant evergreen plants. like the Christmas fern (Polystichum acrostichoides) or the anise tree (Illicium floridanum).

A tax court ruling in a 2008 case ruled that if you meet customers at your home office, keeping the home looking good is ductible. If 8% of the home is used for business, you can deduct 8% of landscaping, lawn care and driveways. A graduate of Oberlin College, Fraser Sherman began writing in 1981. Since then, he has studied and written newspaper articles and magazines on municipal government, court cases, business, real estate and finance, new technologies and the history of cinema. ShermHe has worked for more than a decade as a journalist and his articles have been published in Newsweek , Air u0026 Space , Backpacker and Boys’ Life .

Hardcores for visual accents. For example, evergreen trees add color and unity to winter. Whenever possible, select plants that are of interest all year round. The river birch (Betula nigra) has pretty spring flowers, a beautiful autumn or summer color and an exfoliating bark for the winter. Focus the color where the accent is desired. But when we consider the colors of plants, remember that more is not necessarily better. In a good design, the main colors of the plant are the shades of green that highlight the seasonal accent colors. Do not use too many evergreen plants because they can be visually “heavy” and do not provide as much seasonal change as deciduous plants.

In the event that you suffer a total loss to your home, for example, because of a fire, it is reasonable to assume that your fencing, lawn and other landscaping would have also been Destroyed. In this scenario, you would have a cover to replace these types of elements at the limit of the strategy you will have to choose. For clients who have invested a lot of time and money in a garden, you can choose a limit of $ 100,000 to make sure your investment is protected. Often, customers underestimate the value of their fencing and lawns. It is therefore a good idea to get an estimate of the replacement cost to make sure that the coverage limit you choose will be sufficient.

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