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Deciduous trees can be planted with tall, upright crowns south of the house to provide maximum shade in summer. Trees with lower crowns on the ground are more appropriateIt west, where shade is needed from the lower angles of the afternoon sun. Use tree lanes to channel summer breezes to the house. To escape the winter winds, create windbreaks made up of evergreen trees or shrubs between the house and the direction from where the prevailing winds are coming. Consider shading outdoor air conditioners for maximum energy savings. Plant all the trees far enough away from the house so that when they reach maturity, their root system does not damage the foundations and the branches do not damage the roof.

Soils native to North Carolina range from light sand to heavy clay. In addition, many families are faced with the difficult task of landscaping in "urban soils" which may include mortar, bricks, plasterboard, plywood, plastics and other remains from the building. Often, during the construction of a house, the top layer of soil is removed, leaving compacted basements mixed with construction debris that is unsuitable for growth. plants. Have the soil analyzed and, on the site plan, note both the soil type and the depth of the topsoil. Evaluate the soil in several sections of the property, as soil types can change a short distance, especially if there is a change in altitude.

A wide variety of native plants occurin North Carolina and they can be used to incorporate local natural system elements. See Chapter 12, Native Plants for more information. There is also a variety of non-native ornamental species that thrive in North Carolina. When selecting non-natives, make sure that they are well adapted to the growing conditions of the site, but that they are not designated as invasive or invasive or considered s as a threat to natural habitats. Avoid invasive plants such as English ivy (Hedera helix), Japanese and Chinese (Japanese Ligustrum), Japanese and Chinese wisteria, and Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), which are harmful to the landscape and forest.

You can move them to highlight different parts of your garden, and it's easy to change container gardens each season to get a different look. Our eyes are attracted by color and a lot of carePeople stop there. But it's easier than you think to add a layer of interest to your garden by incorporating the texture. I love this idea of ‚Äč‚Äčlandscaping, with its tidy mounds of blue fescue, punctuated by a pyramid of blue Colorado pinnacle black dwarf pine. A variegated yucca in pot repeats the texture of the grass and adds a new color.

These seem really great landscaping tips! I recently discovered that landscaping is much more difficult than I thought at the start. I agree, it seems to me that it would be much easier for me to build my garden if I understood better the basic elements of design. These tips for understanding balance, pace, unity and form will really help me improve the look of my yard. Thanks for the good ideas. You have given a lot of things to think about! Oh my there are so many wonderful tips here!

Do not try to do everything at the same time - choose one or two things you can do now and consider the things you can implement later. Over time, each small improvement will create a truly sustainable yard, but the biggest impact in the shortest time will be the choice of your plants, which is a good starting point. First, identify the plant material you currently have and eliminate the invasive alien species. The simple removal of invasive plants will make your garden more durable and often more aesthetic. For a list of invasive plants, visit the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council website.

Check out the clean ‘n simple makeover we did to the landscaping around our barn house. We got rid of all the old, over grown bushes, grass, & lava rock and replaced it with 1″ clean rock gravel…

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